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News Highlights

“Dubai BC” session highlights the city’s deeply rooted history

“Dubai BC” session highlights the city’s deeply rooted history

Tuesday, 02 May 2017

While Dubai is well known for its dazzling skyline and modern touristic attractions, the city is also deeply rooted in history which dates back to 8000 BC, according to Loay Al Shareef, Researcher of Ancient Arabian Civilizations. 

Speaking in a session themed "Dubai BC” during 16th edition of the Arab Media Forum in Dubai, Al Shareef said that when people talk about civilizations, they generally talk about historic monuments. “But recent discoveries in Dubai revealed that Dubai has 6 archaeological sites, including five that date back to before Christ (BC),” Al Shareef said.

The discoveries have shown that Dubai was a meeting point for neighbouring civilizations. “For instance, the excavation of Sarooq Al-Hadeed archaeological Site, which dates back to over 3000 years, showed the presence of Pharaonic ring, which means that the ring originated from Egypt, hence there were a trade line between Dubai and ancient Egypt, where caravans pass by the city,” he said.

Al Shareef also said that the excavation of other historical sites, such as Al Qusais, revealed the existence of a settlement dating to the second and first millennium BC. Shaft graves dug straight into the sabkha, of similar date, yielded large numbers of copper or bronze vessels and weaponry, as well as many soft-stone vessels.

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